The Village School MS

731 South Pear Orchard

Ridgeland, MS 39157

 

Dear Amy,

I am writing in reference to Larry Baron. He interviewed with you today about the possibility of teaching anthropology at The Village School MS. I have known Larry for five years. We are both members of the Southern Writers Group and have published several books.

He taught anthropology at University Texas El Paso the last several years and calls upon his personal and unique experience along the Amazon River, and in the jungles of South America, to provide a distinctive learning experience. His experience with the Yanomanö Indians is a fascinating exploration that I am sure students would love to hear.

Larry is knowledgeable of many cultures and their development. I am sure he will provide an exclusive learning experience in preparing students for college.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,

Andy Oldham

 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology at UTEP

1. My friends told me that they really enjoyed taking my class.  Plus, " the teacher is great!"

       ( Audrey Haddad - 8/22/2016 )

2. Previous teammates of mine have taken this class before and they loved it!

       ( Natalie Valentine - ( 8/22/2016 )

3. Yes, Thank you so much! I really enjoyed having you as my professor, this has been a great first semester of college experience! I hope to encounter more professors like yourself! Hope to see you soon!

       (Cynthia Flores 2016)

4. Teachers Assistant Letter

 

Mr. Baron,

 

I am not sure if you remember me but I want to seriously thank you. I was a "lost" student when I attended your eight grade class in Lufkin, Texas at Lufkin Junior High-West in 1982. I enjoyed the science that you brought to life that year. Learning about the past history of the earth, fossils, minerals and Junior Historians has made a solid impact on my life. The following summer that I spent with you, Miguel and Lisa in Van Horn, Texas (Arrowhead Hunting, Camping, and Shooting) was one of the best summers of my childhood. Your class alone sparked a lifetime passion for geology, rock hounding and just being in the great outdoors! I still have most of the rocks you gave me in class! Meeting you has made a positive, instrumental impact on my children. I have taken all of my children on many rock hounding and hiking trips through the years. This has taught them the meaning of family, learning, and the importance of science in our world. We just got back from a trip to Lake Texoma in Texas looking for large ammonites and found quite a few nice specimens. I am sorry to ramble on but I just wanted to thank you for your influence on a student that needed a great teacher to give him a nudge in the right direction. I see through your website that your passion has awarded you with a lifetime of memories! Thank you for all you did for me and my children and hopefully in the future we can meet and go on some expedition! Sincerely,

Jim (Jimmy) Few

 

June 9, 2008

 

Larry Baron to present "The Anasazi/Tarahumara Connection"  on June 21 at the Hubbard Museum of the American West

    The Hubbard Museum is pleased to announce that the fourth installment of the Saturdays at the Hubbard program series will feature a special program for the public entitled, "The Anasazi/Tarahumara Connection" at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 21, with Anthropologist Larry Baron providing the multi-media presentation.

    The Tarahumara Indians are an indigenous people of northern Mexico, renowned for their long-distance running ability. Originally inhabitants of much of the state of Chihuahua, the Tarahumara retreated to the Copper Canyon in the Sierra Madre Occidental on the arrival of Spanish explorers in the sixteenth century. Today they remain a primitive people living apart from the modern technological society. Larry Baron tells marvelous tales of his visits with the Tarahumara, displaying a variety of artifacts collected during his travels. The program will help people learn about how this fascinating culture relates to the Native Americans of our region.

    "We are excited to have a presentation on this topic from an experienced Anthropologist like Larry Baron," commented Museum Director Jay Smith, "his credentials are impeccable and he is a dynamic speaker. He has collected a number of wonderful artifacts that he will share, along with his experiences interacting with theTarahumara."

Signed: Patsy Jackson, Curator of Education

The Hubbard Museum of the American West

and

Jay Smith, Director

The Hubbard Museum of the American West

 

Tuesday, July 10, 2007

 

    Larry Baron is the kind of teacher that most of us want to have - someone who "hooks" us on a subject and motivates us to want to learn more. He's been a collector of interesting artifacts since he was very young and has the real-life adventures and how-to-do-it-yourself stories to go with it all.

    I met Larry in his Ruidoso, New Mexico showroom - LeBaron's Primitives - in the summer of 2006. His store is as much a classroom as it is a retail space. He's a walking, talking encyclopedia on the many places he's traveled and the ways the natives of these locales make and use the unique objects he has displayed. As a career educator myself, I recognized in Larry a genuine curiosity about the world and its people and a passion for teaching  and learning. I boldly asked if he would consider coming to Austin to share his collections and experiences with students in our area Lutheran schools. He confessed that he had really missed the interaction with students and had, in fact, been thinking of getting back into teaching. This was an opportunity he couldn't pass up.

    He supplied me with copies of his journals, radio interviews, teaching credentials, and even scrapbooks detailing class projects and awards he and his former students had won at various competitions. Over the next few months we made more specific lesson plans, discussed academic vocabulary and set a focus for presenting to the different age groups.

    In early March of 2007, Larry loaded a long van and came to Central Texas with his beautiful books and amazing treasures. For one week, he offered his traveling museum to interested individuals, several elementary and middle schools, a high school, a combined group of Boy Scout Troops, and a Lutheran University. For all this, I was able to compensate him with the 'princely' sum of $3000. The true value of his time, knowledge and experience was far greater.

    He was tireless in his loading and unloading of the van and in setting up for the various events. His answers, demonstrations and stories were fresh for each group. Students wrapped themselves in buffalo hides, sat in authentic dug-out canoes, beat on a variety of tribal drums and proved that Zulu baskets really do hold water. Teaching like this is alive and captures all types of learners-auditory, visual and kinesthetic. Who could ask for more?

    I would definitely recommend Larry to any administrator. Although he has been out of the actual classroom for a while, he hasn't lost his touch. He did everything he promised to do- and more. I was honored to "team teach" with him during this week - the magician's assistant, if you will. He inspired us to travel light; to be travelers instead of tourists; and to understand that the land, wherever in the world it is, shapes us and gives us what we need.

Signed: Nancy Kuno, , Retired Middle School Teacher

Redeemer Lutheran School, Austin, TX

 

 

Letter of Student Evaluation, Michael Woolfre

 

 

The Village School MS

731 South Pear Orchard

Ridgeland, MS 39157

 

Dear Amy,

I am writing in reference to Larry Baron. He interviewed with you today about the possibility of teaching anthropology at The Village School MS. I have known Larry for five years. We are both members of the Southern Writers Group and have published several books.

He taught anthropology at University Texas El Paso the last several years and calls upon his personal and unique experience along the Amazon River, and in the jungles of South America, to provide a distinctive learning experience. His experience with the Yanomanö Indians is a fascinating exploration that I am sure students would love to hear.

Larry is knowledgeable of many cultures and their development. I am sure he will provide an exclusive learning experience in preparing students for college.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,

Andy Oldham

Letters of Recommendation

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